Q2 – Lesson #27 – A Day in Need of a Theme

Here’s a link to the “Ignorance Quiz” that I showed at the start of the hour… We’ll use some of Hans Rosling’s video clips next quarter.

We’re sort of in that space between the Industrial Revolution and Age of Imperialism that really lacks a name or defining idea. So, we’ll touch briefly on a few things before shifting our attention to imperialism later this week.

Your comments for the WWED assignment on Lesson #26 should be posted there before Thursday’s class time.

So, here’s our list of things to accomplish today, despite the lack of any unifying theme…

First up, we can take a minute to chat about any of the economics information that needs clarification.

Second, we’re getting to the point where some of what we do will be closely linked to topics that you will also see next year in Modern U.S. History. For example, Chapter 26:1 deals with the expansion of suffrage to more groups of men and to women as well. You’ll take a close look at the women’s suffrage movement in America next year, so we’ll largely leave it alone. (If you know that the 19th century saw the expansion of male suffrage while women in the US and Great Britain didn’t gain the right to vote until after World War I, you are in good shape for this class.)

If you want a bit of a preview, take a look at the Declaration of Sentiments drafted at the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Look familiar?

Third, we’re starting to see the roots of many of the events that will persist well into the 20th century and today. For example, Chapter 26:1 also mentioned several events important in the history of Judaism. You should be familiar with two terms and one event:

  • Anti-Semitism refers to a prejudice against, and/or hatred of, the Jewish people. (Here’s what the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has to say on the topic.)
  • Zionism can be thought of as a sort of Jewish nationalism, in which the goal was to re-establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine. It found a leader in the 1890s in Theodore Herzl.
  • The Dreyfus Affair was an early example of the tension between these two ideas, this time in France in 1894. The trial and imprisonment of Jewish army Captain Alfred Dreyfus was based on false evidence, and it divided the French population. Anti-Semitism certainly played a role in these events, and it was only later that Dreyfus was freed and pardoned.


Fourth, we’ll take a quick look at the themes of expansion and “manifest destiny” as covered in Chapter 26:3. I’ve got an interesting set of three documents related to the Mexican-American War fought between 1846 and 1848. You’ll see what both supporters and opponents of the war thought, as well as what Mexican textbooks have to say about the issue.

Fifth, note that we’re not doing anything specific with the Civil War. I’m assuming that you’ve studied that at some point. (Don’t forget that the Union (the North) won…) If you’ve never taken a look at them before, both the Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation are worth a look…

Finally, the remaining time is yours to work on your 1889 Paris World Exposition presentations. They’ll take place tomorrow. If you have completed that, you might either do the WWED post or work on the take-home quiz.

HOMEWORK for next session – Wednesday, December 11th

TWO readings are due for tomorrow. (This should be the only time we’ll do this for the unit.) We’ll give you the Chapter 26, Section 4, “Nineteenth-Century Progress” (pp. 762 – 767) quiz to take home and complete by the end of the week. The Chapter 27, Section 1, “The Scramble for Africa” (pp. 773 – 778) quiz will be taken in class as usual tomorrow.

Your WWED comments should be emailed to me before class time on Thursday. You can find the instructions on yesterday’s blog entry.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or “Fair” if you prefer) on Wednesday, December 11th. You’ll each have a short presentation ready for that.


Your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, January 6th. Instructions for that are found back on Lesson #25.

Q2 – Lesson #26 – Clashing Views on the Economy

Today, we’ll look at the comparative economic systems a bit more closely.

Debating Economic Systems – If you have strong feelings about one of more of the economic systems we have discussed, here’s your chance to share them. To make things more interesting, you’re going to be ASSIGNED at random to a particular side. You’ll receive a slip with a statement on it. You and the others with the same slips will have fifteen minutes of preparation time and then three minutes to present “your” side. After that, the rest of us can weigh in with our comments. Here are the six “sides” you might receive. (Page 737 is a good starting place for most of you.)

Before we hear each pair of arguments, we’ll make sure we’ve got the basic ideas of each of these down.

Capitalism

Capitalism is the most effective economic system.
Capitalism is a flawed economic system.


Socialism

Socialism is the most effective economic system.
Socialism is a flawed economic system


Marxism (Communism)

Marxism is the ideal economic system.
Marxism is a flawed economic system.


WWED? – “What Would the Economist Do?”
Here’s where history meets current events.

You’re going to select one of these economists:
  • Adam Smith
  • David Ricardo
  • Thomas Malthus
  • Charles Fourier
  • Karl Marx

Now, bring that person to the present. You’re going to have “them” write a blog comment that you will post to this lesson. All comments should be emailed to me before the start of class time on Thursday. Have your economist comment upon/ analyze/ make recommendations for one of the current economic issues facing either the United States or the world. Obviously, what you write should be consistent with what your economist might say about the issue were they alive today.

Figure a minimum of one good paragraph. Be sure it is clear both which economist you are writing as and what the issue is that they are writing about. (Of course, be sure I also know who is really posting the blog comment so that you can get credit.)

By the way, I debated whether or not to use the WWED phrasing since WWJD (“What would Jesus do?”) was originally a term used by some Christian groups. My thought is that it has become enough of a pop culture expression (“What would ____ do?”) that there is no offense here. Doing a little research (cough, Wikipedia), I discovered there’s a term for that: snowclone. That’s a cliche that “can be used in an entirely open array of different variants by lazy … writers.” Hey, that’s me.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow – Tuesday, December 10th

Much of the information should look pretty familiar to you, but continue your reading in Chapter 26, Section 3, “War and Expansion in the United States.” (pp. 758 – 761) We’re back to multiple choice in the quiz rotation.

Your WWED? blog comment is due to be emailed before the start of class Thursday.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or “Fair” if you prefer) on Wednesday, December 11th. You’ll each have a short presentation
ready for that.

Your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, January 6th. Instructions for that are found back on Lesson #25.

Q2 – Lesson #25 – Economics for Sophomores

We’re at a key time in the world’s history in terms of the field of economics. You’ve been introduced to Smith and Marx, as well as a number of terms used in the field. I think that both the rest of this year and all of next year’s United States history will make more sense if we spend some time looking at these people and ideas. We’ll do that today.

Charts and graphs and other things, Oh my! (That’s a version of the “Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh, my!” exchange from The Wizard of Oz… Just thought you might want to know.) I’ve got several sheets containing various styles and sorts of information. You’ll get one of them, and we’ll share what we’ve got…

Cartoons – Industrialization and Imperialism- In this assignment, you will produce two cartoons of your own in editorial/political cartoon style. One will be on industrialization (or a closely related issue) and one will be on imperialism (or a specific example). These will both be due on Monday, January 6th, but I will certainly take them earlier.

Here are the guidelines:

  • My preference is for each cartoon to be in black/color ink on 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper.
  • You may use multiple panels, but most cartoons of this style are usually a single panel.
  • Text on the cartoon may be typed (cut and paste) or hand-written, but must be legible.
  • Your ideas are more important than artistic excellence, but there should be evidence of appropriate effort.
  • You will be evaluated on adherence to topic, effectiveness of “message”, creativity and execution.
I will show you a couple examples from previous years. If you want some additional samples, you might check these sites out:

Migration – 19th Century People on the Move- We’ll do a couple of quick activities here on the movements of people around the world in the 19th century.

Remember that you may have identified “push” and “pull” factors that affected migration patterns last year. We’ll use that idea again today. In addition, we’ll take a look at the different types of migration.

  • internal
  • external
  • chain
  • temporary
1889 Paris World Exposition – I probably shouldn’t admit this, but the idea for this assignment came from The Magic Tree House book, The Night of the New Magicians. You’re going to have to do a little time traveling with me for this one to work, but here’s the premise.

We’re all at the 1889 Paris World Exposition. You each have a person and topic on which to present. (You will work alone or in pairs.) We’ll be focusing on the material from Chapter 26, Section 4, “Nineteenth-Century Progress.” Yes, I KNOW some of the things you’ll be presenting on were not even invented yet in 1889. That’s the whole time travel thing.

For each of the presentations, I’d like to see the following elements as appropriate:

  • something visual (Powerpoint or video clip or whatever)
  • background on the development or invention
  • consideration of both the economic and social consequences of the idea/invention
  • mention of key developments/impacts since the original idea/invention
Here are the people and ideas/inventions from which you’ll choose:
  • Thomas Edison – phonograph and light bulb (others?)
  • Alexander Graham Bell – telephone
  • Guglielmo Marconi – radio
  • Henry Ford – automobile
  • Wright Brothers – human flight
  • Louis Pasteur – germ theory of disease
  • Joseph Lister – antiseptics
  • Charles Darwin – evolution
  • Gregor Mendel – genetics
  • Dmitri Mendeleev – periodic table of the elements
  • Marie and Pierre Curie – radioactivity
  • Sigmund Freud – psychology
  • Herbert Spencer – Social Darwinism

We’ll hold our version of the 1889 Paris World Exposition on Thursday, December 11th. Here’s information on the “real” 1889 World’s Fair if you are curious.


“Economics for Sophomores” – I’m teaching Economics fourth quarter to some seniors, but we’ll try and give you a quick overview today. Think of this more as a “workshop” than a lecture. I’ll get you trying some graphing, etc.

Download a copy of this Economics for Sophomores note guide and have a piece of paper and writing instrument ready…


HOMEWORK for next session – Monday, December 9th

Continue your reading in Chapter 26, Section 2, “Self-Rule for British Colonies.” (pp. 751 – 755) The quiz will be matching.

Just a reminder that your Cartoons: Industrialization and Imperialism assignments are due on Monday, January 6th.

We will be holding our 1889 Paris World Exposition (or “Fair” if you prefer) on Wednesday, December 11th. You’ll each have a short presentation ready for that.

Q2 – Lesson #24 – Industrial Revolution Roundtable Discussion

If you have any of the take-home quizzes to turn in today, that’s great. If not, please make sure I get them tomorrow.

Industrial Revolution Discussion- I’ll have a handout for you with both our “roster” of characters and the specific questions with which we’ll begin our discussion. We’ll plan on at least fifteen minutes for each of the three “sections” of our overall conversation. We’ll take time for introductions at the start of each of the three panels.

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings
Jethro Tull
Robert Bakewell
John Kay
Eli Whitney
James Watt
Robert Fulton
John McAdam
Richard Trevithick

Questions for this first panel:
  • What do you think was the most important cause of the Industrial Revolution?
  • Why England?
  • Was industrialization inevitable? If so, why don’t we see it outside Europe at this time?
  • Was increased population a cause or an effect of the Industrial Revolution? Explain.
  • Would the world have been better off without the shift from an agrarian to an industrial outlook in much of the world?
  • Which development was the most crucial to the Industrial Revolution?
  • Which of the inventions of the Industrial Revolution most affects us today?
The Industrial Revolution: Effects
Elizabeth Gaskell
William Cooper
Ned Ludd
Michael Thomas Sadler
victim of cholera outbreak
Birmingham coal miner
Francis Cabot Lowell
Lucy Larcom

Questions for this second panel:
  • Industrialization: Was it worth it? Why or why not?
  • Was the effect of the Industrial Revolution the same on men and women?
  • Which affected life the most: the French Revolution or the Industrial Revolution?
  • How much of the suffering and difficulties of the Industrial Revolution could have been easily prevented?
  • Was greed the primary cause of the revolution’s negative impacts?
  • What, if anything, could reasonably have been done to improve the lives of
    workers and citizens during the time of the Industrial Revolution?
  • How did the Industrial Revolution change society?
The Industrial Revolution: Responses
Adam Smith
David Ricardo
Thomas Malthus
John Stuart Mill
Robert Owen
Charles Fourier
Karl Marx
Friedrich Engels

Questions for this third panel:
  • To what extent was “your” work a reaction to the Industrial Revolution?
  • In your mind, was the Industrial Revolution positive or negative? Why?
  • How could the negative effects of industrialization been minimized?
  • What should be the relationship between the workers and the factory owners?
  • Are their ethical and/or human rights issues at stake here in the Industrial Revolution?
  • How and when should government intervene in the affairs of business?
  • Did the Industrial Revolution cause an increase in global inequality? Why or why not?
  • What are the most lasting impacts of the Industrial Revolution?
  • Are we undergoing technological changes that will later be seen as a “revolution?”

HOMEWORK for next session – Thursday, December 5th

Please start your reading in Chapter 26 with Section 1, “Democratic Reform and Activism.” (pp. 747 – 750) The quiz will be true/false.

Q2 – Lesson #23 – Examining the Industrial Revolution

Here’s a online copy of the Unit #6 Review and Study Guide.

The Industrial Revolution – “Oral DBQ Essay Thingies”

We’ll give you five minutes to touch base in your groups from yesterday, and then we’ll go through the three different “essays” as a sort of introductory activity to this chapter. Your “essay” should be in an outline style form, but it need not flow smoothly or be perfectly worded. Each of you will be expected to talk.

You were asked to incorporate these:
  • Some sort of attention getter or “hook” for a first line. (Tell us why you chose what you did.)
  • Thesis that is responsive to your specific topic. (This should be carefully phrased, not just made up on the spot.)
  • A minimum of three body paragraphs
  • Each paragraph should be clearly in support of your thesis.
  • Each paragraph should refer to evidence from at least two of the documents.
  • You should document which sources you are using.
  • You should have a concluding paragraph that ties things together.

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings

“Why did the Industrial Revolution begin in England?”

The Industrial Revolution: Effects

“Evaluate the positive and negative effects of the Industrial Revolution.”

The Industrial Revolution: Responses

“How were the evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries?”

You’ll each get a copy of the other two packets, so you’ll have a complete set of these assignments to use for notes and information.

Industrial Revolution – Discussion
Tomorrow, we’ll host a discussion on a variety of topics related to the Industrial Revolution. You will be assigned a role for this. Basically, your “character” will be most involved in one of the three phases of the discussion, and those phases will mirror the three DBQs: beginnings, effects and responses.

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings
Jethro Tull (p. 717)
Robert Bakewell (p. 718)
John Kay (p. 718-719)
Eli Whitney (p. 720)
James Watt (p. 721)
Robert Fulton (p. 720)
John McAdam (p. 721)
Richard Trevithick (p. 721)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want
to know who you are and how you contributed to the Industrial
Revolution. (Figure around 1 minute or so.)

The Industrial Revolution: Effects
Elizabeth Gaskell (p. 724)
William Cooper (p. 724/DBQ)
Ned Ludd (p. 726)
Michael Thomas Sadler (DBQ)
victim of cholera outbreak (p. 724)
Birmingham coal miner (p. 725)
Francis Cabot Lowell (p. 729)
Lucy Larcom (p. 730)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want to know how you were affected by the Industrial Revolution, as well as what you believe should be done.

The Industrial Revolution: Responses
Adam Smith (p. 724)
David Ricardo (p. 735)
Thomas Malthus (p. 735)
John Stuart Mill (p. 735)
Robert Owen (p. 736)
Charles Fourier (p. 736)
Karl Marx (p. 736)
Friedrich Engels (p. 736)

At the beginning, you will be asked to briefly introduce yourself. We want to understand your basic position, as well as what, if anything, you believe should be done in response to the Industrial Revolution and its effects.

You’ll be provided with specific topics and questions for the rest of the discussion next class.

Powerpoint “Introduction”: We’re going to try something a little different today, and I want your feedback on its value. We’re going to watch an overview PowerPoint presentation on Industrialization and Its Consequences. This is from the A World History for Us All curriculum that I have borrowed a number of things from. The idea is that you might watch this at the start of what they call, “Big Era 7: The Modern Revolution.” I think some of it is really good (some kind of goofy), and it does a good job of linking the ideas we’ve been studying to industrialization while previewing some of what is to come.

HOMEWORK for next session – Thursday, December 6th

Please read Chapter 25, Section 4 (“Reforming the Industrial World,” pp. 734 – 740) for tomorrow. That’s it. (Of course, you need to turn in the take-home quizzes assigned for today if that hasn’t already happened.) We’ll be back to fill-in-the-blank for the 25:4 quiz.

Be ready to play your “role” in our Industrial Revolution Roundtable discussion.

Q2 – Lesson #22 – The Industrial Revolution

Welcome to Unit #6. Consider yourself officially 1/4 of the way done with World History 10. Here’s a online copy of the Unit #6 Review and Study Guide.


“70% Second Chance” Policy – There’s no doubt that these multiple choice questions can be challenging. If the exam did not go well for you, we’re offering you a second chance to get your score up to 70%. (That would be 42 out of 60.)

If you score below 42, you can make corrections to your exam. (These may be done open book, open internet, and open notes.) You will receive the average of your “original” score and your “second chance” score, with a maximum of 42 possible. You should also attempt to correct all of the exam, even if that would put you above the maximum.

The Industrial Revolution – We’re going to try this one a little differently. Since you just came off an essay and a set of DBQs, we’re going to try and combine those two skills. We’re going to break into three groups. I have three different DBQ activities related to the Industrial Revolution. Basically, each group is going to prepare to “talk” an essay tomorrow.

These are the three DBQs and their essay topics:

The Industrial Revolution: Beginnings

“Why did the Industrial Revolution begin in England?”

The Industrial Revolution: Effects

“Evaluate the positive and negative effects of the Industrial Revolution.”

The Industrial Revolution: Responses

“How were the evils of the Industrial Revolution addressed in England in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries?”

Today, each group should work through their DBQ packet, keeping in mind the essay topic they will address tomorrow.

Your “essay” should be in an outline type form, but it need not flow smoothly or be perfectly worded. In fact, each of you will be expected to talk.

Please incorporate these:
  • Some sort of attention getter or “hook” for a first line. (Tell us why you chose what you did.)
  • Thesis that is responsive to your specific topic. (This should be carefully phrased, not just made up on the spot.)
  • A minimum of three body paragraphs
  • Each paragraph should be clearly in support of your thesis.
  • Each paragraph should refer to evidence from at least two of the documents.
  • You should document which sources you are using.
  • You should have a concluding paragraph that ties things together.
Remember, you DO NOT need to write this all out. Think of it as sharing your planning with us. Obviously, we have two goals for this. First, we can think specifically about putting together a history essay. Second, we can start to learn about the Industrial Revolution and its impact on the world.


HOMEWORK for tomorrow – Tuesday, December 3rd

You can turn in the Chapter 25, Section 1 quiz if you have completed that. I expect to have them all from you by tomorrow’s class.


I want to mix things up a bit to keep us on a schedule that makes sense with our two four-day weeks. Let’s do this. I’m going to give you the 25:2 (“Industrialization”) AND 25:3 (“Industrialization Spreads”) quizzes for you to take home tonight. You WILL be asked to do the quiz for 25:4 in-class on Wednesday.

I expect you’ll more or less finish in class, but each group should be ready to “present” their essay preparation tomorrow.

Q2 – Lesson #21 – Unit #5 Multiple Choice Exam

It is a pretty straight-forward plan for today. You’ll take the objective portion of the Unit #5 Exam. It has 60 multiple choice questions.

If you need to finish up the DBQs, you can also do that after.

“70% Second Chance” Policy – Ms. Murr and I decided a couple of years ago to experiment with a new policy in World 9/10. There’s no doubt that these multiple choice questions can be challenging. If the exam does not go well for you, we’re offering you a second chance to get your score up to 70%. (That would be 42 out of 60.)

If you score below 42, you are allowed to come in and make corrections to your exam. (These may be done open book and open notes.) You will receive the average of your “original” score and your “second chance” score, with a maximum of 42 possible.

For example, let’s say you scored 36. You then corrected your exam to a 58. (36 + 58 = 94. 94/2 = 47, but you would receive the maximum of 42.)

You are expected to do this relatively soon after the exam, and you should also attempt to correct all of the exam, even if that would put you above the maximum.

HOMEWORK for next session: Monday, December 2nd

Remember that your Unit #5 Essay is due by the end of Tuesday. Please print them out. (Double-sided is fine, and I prefer at least 1 and 1/2 or double spacing.)

Ms. Murr would tell you that only a real meanie assigns homework the night of the exam. I guess that makes me a meanie… Please read Section 1 in Chapter 25, “The Beginnings of Industrialization.” (pp. 717- 722) This is a relatively short quarter, so we need to keep going. (We may again need to double up once on the reading.) I will give you the quiz today and you can complete it as a take-home activity. (That does NOT mean you should simply copy someone else’s answers. If I see anyone doing that, it is “0″ for both people. I am fine with you working together in study hall or elsewhere, but not simply copying.)

Q2 – Lesson #20 – Unit #5 Identifications and DBQs

If you plan to word-process, you can download a copy of the
Unit #5 Identifications answer sheet.

REMINDER: You must finish the identifications before you leave class. Start with those. You do NOT need to be done with the DBQs.

Unit #5 Identifications:
You’ll receive (or download) a handout from which you will write on your choice of 5 of the 8 identifications that appear. You may have 10 words of “notes” for each of the 15 possible identifications to the exam. You will need to turn in these notes, and I reserve the right to count symbols, acronyms, etc. as one or more words. Each of the five identifications is worth 5 points.

A good identification is typically in the range of 4 to 6 sentences in length. (You do need to write in complete sentences.) You should demonstrate both an understanding of just who / what the ID “is” and place it in the appropriate historical context. In addition, you need to explain the significance of the ID. In other words, answer the “So what?” question.

Unit #5 Essay Exam – Questions and Format – Your essays are due no later than the end of the day on Tuesday. Please have them printed out. Double-sided is fine. Please use something other than single spacing.

You should prepare for a five (or six)-paragraph essay. That means that you should include an introduction (with a clear thesis statement), three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph. (Note that the questions lend themselves to such a format. That is on purpose.)

Remember that the questions are not designed for you to tell us everything you have learned. Focus on what the question is requiring you to do.

1. We considered the reigns of a number of absolute monarchs. Choose THREE specific monarchs and evaluate the impact of their reigns. Overall, was absolutism a positive or negative force in the Europe of the time?

2. The Enlightenment was a time of significant changes in thinking and values. Identify and evaluate the significance of what you consider to be the THREE most significant contributions of the Enlightenment. Which specific figure do you believe best embodied the spirit of the Enlightenment? Why?

3. We studied the causes of political revolution in places such as England, the American colonies, France, Haiti and Mexico. Choose THREE of these revolutions and evaluate whether each was justified. Which of the revolutions that you discuss do you believe was ultimately the most successful? Why?

HOMEWORK for tomorrow – Tuesday, November 26th

You have the Unit #5 Objective Exam tomorrow. There are 60 multiple choice questions.

Your Unit #5 Essay is due to me no later than the end of the day on Tuesday.

Q2 – Lesson #19 – Unit #5 “Two-Minute” Review

We’ll spend today doing our review activity. We’ll get started right away so that we can get through this all. If there is time remaining in 2nd block, we can sneak in a couple more presentations.

Here’s a copy of the Unit #5 Review and Study Guide. (You received a paper copy on the second day of class. This is the same as that one.)

Here’s a copy of the Unit #5 “Two-Minute” Review template that I use to take notes on the projector.

UNIT 5: Absolutism to Revolution (1500 – 1900)

Chapter 21: Absolute Monarchs in Europe (1500 – 1800)

1 Spain’s Empire and European Absolutism
2 The Reign of Louis XIV
3 Central European Monarchs Clash
4 Absolute Rulers of Russia
5 Parliament Limits the English Monarchy


Chapter 22: Enlightenment and Revolution (1550 – 1789)

1 The Scientific Revolution
2 The Enlightenment in Europe
3 The Enlightenment Spreads
4 The American Revolution


Chapter 23: The French Revolution and Napoleon (1789 – 1815)

1 The French Revolution Begins
2 Revolution Begins Reform and Terror
3 Napoleon Forges an Empire
4 Napoleon’s Empire Collapses
5 The Congress of Vienna


Chapter 24: Nationalist Revolutions Sweep the West (1789 – 1900)

1 Latin American Peoples Win Independence
2 Europe Faces Revolution
3 Nationalism
4 Revolutions in the Arts



HOMEWORK for next session – Monday, November 25th

We’ll have the Unit #5 Exam on Monday and Tuesday. Monday will be the Identifications and DBQs. On Tuesday, we’ll have the Objective Exam. That will consist of 60 multiple choice questions.

Your Unit #5 Essay is due to me no later than at the end of the day on Tuesday.

You can access the Unit #5 Identifications and Essay information between Lessons #15 and #16 on the blog. (Scroll down to find it, as the links on the side don’t seem to be working – at least not for me.)

Q2 – Lesson #18 – MPA Romanticism and Realism Arts Festival

“MPA Romanticism and Realism Arts Festival” – Welcome. Today, we’ll take some time to consider some of the new movements in the arts that we’ve been reading about.

I was going to change the order a little, but I suppose we’ll stick with this as much as possible. It’s the way they appear in the readings, so that might be helpful to you in terms of review, etc. Figure that no one should take much more than five or six minutes for their presentation.

  • art of El Greco and Velazquez
  • Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes
  • art of Rembrandt van Rijn
  • Moliere’s comedic plays
  • baroque art and architecture
  • music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • music of Ludwig van Beethoven
  • British romantic poets (choose among Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, John Keats)
  • Les Miserables and The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • opera of Giuseppe Verdi and/or Richard Wagner
  • Louis Daguerre and the daguerreotype
  • works of Charles Dickens
  • art of Claude Monet
  • art of Edgar Degas
  • art of Pierre-Auguste Renoir


HOMEWORK for tomorrow – Friday, November 22nd

You are done with the reading for Unit #5. Congratulations.

Your part of the Unit #5 Two-Minute Review should be ready to go for tomorrow.

We’ll have the Unit #5 Exam on Monday and Tuesday. Monday will be the Identifications and DBQs. The other day will be the Objective Exam. That will consist of 60 multiple choice questions. You can find the essay questions and identification list on the blog between Lesson #15 and Lesson #16. (I should receive your essay no later than the end of the day on Tuesday, November 26th.)